Tuesday, August 3, 2010

Grab some coffee, it's gonna be a long one...

Sorry to do this. I don't like long blog posts. End up not reading them at all or skimming too fast. Thought about multiple posts, but I just want to get this off my chest and get working on a really cool bike. You know what I'm talkin' 'bout... So, here goes. Not going to get mired in the details. Pictures speak for themselves with a bit of assistance.

Went for a ride yesterday. Saw this monster of a salamander scuttling across the road as I climbed the Marshall Wall from Hog Island Oysters. That's a 45 shoe for comparison. I tried to get it off the road, but the two times I tried to pick it up, it slipped out of my fingers and I didn't really want to grab on tight (you know what I mean if you've tried to pick up something slimy that didn't want to get picked up). Hope it didn't get squished by a car. That'd be an ugly sound.

ride 2010-08-02 002

ride 2010-08-02 004

Built up a really cool Surly Cross Check. Well, actually just swapped out some parts. It's going to be used as a commuter in the city. The new bars and fenders really change the bike's personality. Sweet bike!

surly 003

surly 001

Finally got the Pereira Roaring 29er finished. Well, it's waiting for the correct seat post which is back ordered.

Pereira Roaring 29er

There are a lot of really cool details.

Pereira Roaring 29er

Pereira Roaring 29er

Pereira Roaring 29er

Pacenti fork crown
Pereira Roaring 29er

Pereira Roaring 29er

Pereira Roaring 29er

Paul Components chain keep with lower edge filed for clearance from the inside of the White Ind. Eno crank.
Pereira Roaring 29er

Pereira Roaring 29er

Pereira Roaring 29er

Pereira Roaring 29er

The frame was built as a single speed, but the owner wanted to run it as a one-by-nine. I found some really nice aluminum cable guides from Jagwire that are held by a strong 3M double face tape. After locating the exact position for the guides, I masked off the location and scuffed the clear coat so the tape took a really good bond. I tested this method on a junker frame and it took a pair of needle nose pliers and a strong grip to peel the guide off. They are on there.

Pereira Roaring 29er

Pereira Roaring 29er

Pereira Roaring 29er

Because they are aluminum, the guides can be formed to the smaller diameter shape of the chain stay.

Pereira Roaring 29er

A Cunningham and a Steve Potts single speed came in for service and repair too. I don't just work on new bikes.
Cunningham + Potts

Steve Potts SS

Steve Potts SS

Steve Potts SS

And also had to deal with some bikes that aren't quite like the ones above...

bike 010

What's that grinding sound?
img 020

Oh, my chain trying to saw through my derailleur cage.
img 021

What's wrong with my cranks. It's hard to turn them.
You'll need a new bb

Could it be because the bearings are square?
Bearing

(What's playing: Muddy Waters Rosalie)


2 comments:

Anonymous said...

How durable these taped cable guid should be?
Can that would work on Ti as well?

Thanks

blackmountaincycles said...

They are adhered very securely. They are guides and not stops, so they are not under any kind of tension. That being said, if it was my bike, I would always have a few zip-ties with me, just in case. Probably store a few zip-ties down the seat tube.

I was going to use 3M silicone adhesive (what Steve Potts uses to secure his heavy brass head badges) to secure the guides, but trying to peel off the tape resulted in a mangled guide. That stuff is tough!